Zionofascism Crippled

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Toronto 18 Scare-orism Scam Exploding in Zionists Faces

Posted by Anarchore on September 26, 2008

“From the first terrifying charges outlined by prosecutors to the
gritty, often comically deflated details that have emerged in court,
the case of the Toronto 18 seems to fit a well-established pattern in
terrorism prosecutions. Whether the result of trumped-up charges,
conflicting demands of intelligence agencies or difficulties of trying
cases where evidence is withheld by governments looking to protect
their sources and methods, numerous terrorism trials in the United
States and Europe have similarly foundered over the years.”

Yeah no shit, it is government scare-orism to support the terrorist imperial and police state policies of the neocon White House and their Israeli masters. The liquid bomb hoax fizzled similarly in Britain, and remember the Miami terrorist group that turned out to be nothing as well?

We are witnessing the internationally co-ordinated false accusations, and police agency entrapment of Muslims, to create sympathy for Zionists and their wars, and justify the anti-democratic ‘security certificates’, where the authorities don’t have to have proof, they can just disappear you.

Part of this is surely to misdirect people from understanding that Zionists where instrumental in the Sept 11 attacks.

But now as with the banking scandals(also Jew scams), the Zionist terror scams are falling apart. What will happen when the public realizes it is being taken for a ride with the government scare-orism?

The payback for the UberKikes is going to be enormous. How about a payback for ‘Nazi hunters’ like Simon Wiesenthals who persecuted old men for being guards. Now there will be no more ‘Nazi hunters’, persecuting Germans, it will be Zionist-hunters that will go after terrorist Jewry and their Goy puppets. Oh yes, we are in for interesting times indeed.

Full NYT story follows:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/25/world/americas/25canada.html

At Canada Terror Trial, the Accused Take on a Less Sinister Cast
September 24, 2008

BRAMPTON, Ontario — The story that first emerged about the 18 men and
teenagers, all Muslims, who were arrested in and around Toronto in
June 2006, was deeply disturbing. Police officials and prosecutors
told of plots to bomb government offices in Toronto and Ottawa as well
as a nuclear power station, and of a planned attack on Parliament with
the aim of capturing Prime Minister Stephen Harper and decapitating
him.

Zafar Bangash, an imam and commentator, spoke Wednesday in Toronto on
behalf of several suspects.

Charges were dropped this year against seven of the defendants. And
evidence presented at the first trial suggests that the group was long
on inflammatory talk about plots but short on the means and methods to
carry them out, and that it was aided — and perhaps provoked — by paid
police informants.

From the first terrifying charges outlined by prosecutors to the
gritty, often comically deflated details that have emerged in court,
the case of the Toronto 18 seems to fit a well-established pattern in
terrorism prosecutions. Whether the result of trumped-up charges,
conflicting demands of intelligence agencies or difficulties of trying
cases where evidence is withheld by governments looking to protect
their sources and methods, numerous terrorism trials in the United
States and Europe have similarly foundered over the years.

This month, for example, a London jury dealt a blow to
counterterrorism officials when it convicted three of eight defendants
of conspiracy to commit murder but failed to reach verdicts on the
more serious charge of a conspiracy to blow up seven airliners with
liquid explosives.

While no expert observer is willing to forecast this week’s verdict,
many agree that the Toronto 18 may be more a gang that could not shoot
straight than Canada’s first serious homegrown terrorist threat since
a group of Quebec separatists kidnapped a British diplomat and
kidnapped and killed a provincial cabinet minister in 1970.

“There was certainly a portrait drawn of this being a serious
terrorist cell involving a large number of individuals who had
bloodthirsty objectives,” said Wesley Wark, of the Munk Center for
International Studies at the University of Toronto. “We didn’t get a
chance to assess those claims until this trial. Then things became
instantly much murkier.”

Because the man on trial was 17 years old when arrested, he cannot be
identified under Canadian law. But evidence presented in court made it
clear that, at best, he was a minor character in the group, one who
appears to have been more interested in chopping firewood than in
jihad.

No matter how minor his role, though, the evidence presented in the
case presents a broad picture of the months leading to the raids,
which, the police said, were timed to prevent the group from acquiring
fertilizer to create bombs. The evidence was so broad that a court
order prevents the publication of the identities of other people
described in it to avoid prejudicing later trials.

The man, who was accused of participating in terrorist training, moved
to Canada from Sri Lanka in 1994 and was raised a Hindu. He converted
to Islam in high school and met many of his accused accomplices,
including a man prosecutors depict as the ringleader, at a mosque in
the Scarborough area of Toronto.

But there was no evidence offered directly linking the defendant to
the bomb plot or plans to storm Parliament. Instead, most of the case
focused on his attendance at two camps that the police described as
terrorist training sessions but that prosecution witnesses
characterized as recreational or religious retreats. Both were
videotaped by a paid police informant who was part of the group and
who testified that he choreographed some of the scenes.

Video from a camp north of Toronto in December 2005 shows a car
spinning around in a nearby, snow-covered parking lot. Prosecutors
characterized that as special driver training but the defense, and
many outsiders, said it was nothing more than “cutting doughnuts,” a
favorite winter pastime of young Canadian motorists. Other video from
the camp shows paintball fights, military clothing and members
marching with a group flag.

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